Trees die every day – mostly from people still using notebooks at college.  Who the hell still pays a hundred bucks for a textbook?

The college experience has changed and is changing rapidly. Google Drive has taken the place of printers and iPad the place of a textbook. And so, studying has changed.

You may now type at lightning speed, memorize entire Wikipedia articles, plan your homework never to miss a beat. And more – full record lectures, turning them from voice to text on the spot.

Interested? Here are some apps to make college a piece of cake:

Type Fu

Better hand in something than nothing at all-“ is what you’ll hear from professors all the time. Writing fast is a superpower. Moments will come where you have to type up an essay an hour before class – and if you’re a slow typer, expect a lousy grade.

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Type Fu can help you become the kung-fu master of typing. Learn tricks you’d never have imagined, and challenge yourself with tests for speed and precision. Being the fastest isn’t always bad.

myHomework Student Planner

Throw away your disgusting, old, wrinkled, unusable, uncomfortable planner. Wasting paper is terrible anyway, haven’t you heard?

Instead, replace your planner with this app. It’s got all the same features like a physical planner, except it’s easily accessible, manageable, and takes a dummy to learn how to use. Start using this planner regularly, and you’ll never be late on a homework assignment again.

Not to mention you’ll save trees.

WikiSpeaker

So your exam on the French Revolution is tomorrow – but you forgot the entire lecture. And that Wikipedia page is waaaay too long to read. You can see where this is headed.

Here’s an app to lighten up your soul: WikiSpeaker. It does exactly what you think it does. It reads out Wikipedia articles. And it does so with some proper dictation, not like Google Translate. The most significant upside is learning more than they teach in class.

Wikireader speaks German, French, Spanish and Russian.

Evernote

Yeah yeah, everybody loves this app. We know — the Swiss-army knife of writing apps and such. To be quite honest, it takes some learning to use. The note pad organizer and journal in one makes it slightly confusing where to write what.

But an underrated feature is the voice-to-text conversion, which allows you to record lectures directly into notes. Perfect for reviewing in the future, and no need to use pieces of paper when you forget your notebook to class.

EssayPro

You might say, “that’s all fine and dandy, but what if there was an app which could actually write essays for me?” You’re in luck pal – there’s EssayPro.

But wait! Essay services have a bad reputation for bad quality!

True but not this one. Other services lack proper payment systems and the possibility of editing. On EssayPro you get to deposit a sum of money and use it to pay the writer only AFTER you’ve read and approved all their drafts. Also, you get to edit those drafts, add academic sources, and help the writer mirror your writing style. All the online help with essay type assignments you can get.

Perfect for students who need to clear homework assignments to study for exams or work on personal goals.

The Mind-Map Apps

Mind maps have gained lots of popularity recently. More startups started picking up on the fact that mind maps actually help memorize lots of material. Scientific proof doesn’t lie.

Some of the most recommended mind-mapping apps are simpleMind Lite and Mind note 5. Big HairyGoal is a sort-of experimental mind-map app helping you achieve specific goals. Be sure to check them all out; it’s a matter of preference.

But the benefit of mind-mapping is genuinely huge. You might have seen pop culture heroes like Sherlock Holmes and Alan Turing use mind maps. Wait that’s the same person…

Udemy or Coursera

By far the best cheat-code to college is when you know all the study material before you get into the class. Then every class is a review, and you graduate with a bang, and maybe an honor. Here’s how you do it:

Enter the worldwide web, the entire database of human knowledge. Next head to Udemy or Coursera and study literally any course (from any university) for free. After about six hours of videos (and some readings), you’ll be ahead of your class.

Also, if you’re the lazy type, head on YouTube and gain the power of knowledge from CrashCourse or The School of Life.